Allman Brothers Band, Boston Tea Party, 1970

Ravioli Graffiti Studios

 

Allman Brothers Band, Boston Tea Party, 1970

 

First printing, lithograph, Condition excellent, board-mounted

 

Framed: 22" tall x 26" wide

 

$$$

Frame at angle

close-up of frame, right

close-up of frame, left

Description

Early Allman Brothers when the band still had Duane Allman and Berry Oakley posters are very rare and sought after. This thin poster had been heat-mounted to a textured matte board which will prevent it from buckling.

 

 

The Allman Brothers eponymous first album was released a year before these shows in November 1969. The band played continuously in 1970, performing over 300 dates on the road traveling in a Ford Econoline van and later, a Winnebago, nicknamed the Wind Bag. Capricorn Records co-founder Phil Walden doubted the band's future, worrying whether they would ever catch on, but word of mouth spread due to the band's relentless touring schedule, and crowds got larger. Idlewild South, their second album which contained “Midnight Rider,” and “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed,” had been released in September and the band was cooking.

 

 

A report from the November 20 show: “They were late to the show because of the interview at WBCN. They played till about 1 am. Then the Tea Party played their exit music. Most of the people left. I hung around and spoke to Berry. Then the MC got up on stage and said they were going to do another set. Call everyone back …but most everyone left. There couldn’t have been a hundred people left. The jammed till about 3 AM. The best Allman Brothers Show I ever saw.”

 

 

Meanwhile, the Grateful Dead had rolled into town to play at Boston University and so the afternoon before the November 21 show WBCN gathered Duane Allman, Jerry Garcia and Bob Weir for an impromptu acoustic set consisting of, El Paso, Big River, I know you Rider, Dark Hollow, Angie, and Let Me In.

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